Tobii Pro launches new advancement in eye trackers for behavioral research - Healthcare Training and Education
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Tobii Pro launches new advancement in eye trackers for behavioral research

Tobii Pro, a provider of eye-tracking research solutions, continues its expansion of research tools for academic researchers with the release of a 1200 Hz edition of its Tobii Pro Spectrum eye tracker – a device that could be applied to education and training, and key in future development of virtual and augmented reality as well as the treatment of disease.

Tobii Pro Spectrum Eye Trackers

Researchers in psycholinguistics, psychology, vision, ophthalmology and the human brain will benefit from the unique combination of millisecond accuracy, robust trackability, a large headbox and a sampling frequency of 1200 Hz that is double the capacity of the previous model.

“Since each research question is unique, research tools that can handle varying research questions are needed,” said Tom Englund, president Tobii Pro. “With Pro Spectrum 1200 we are adding an eye tracker for researchers whose studies require extremely detailed information about eye movements. This new tool will help researchers uncover completely new and deeper understandings of the correlation between gaze and human physiology and behavior.”

The average saccade (when the eye moves from one point to another) is 40 milliseconds and to study these very fast eye movements the resolution of the eye tracking data is key. Tobii Pro Spectrum delivers a high sampling rate while still maintaining the highest standard of data quality. The increased granularity of the eye tracking data will help researchers achieve a greater understanding of the behaviors exhibited by people with psychiatric disorders or brain damage. It opens the door for advances in research of diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease, where degeneration of nerves in the brain starts to affect eye movement very subtly at an early stage.

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